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TNJames  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, June 13, 2018 4:03:27 AM(UTC)
TNJames

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 6/13/2018(UTC)
Posts: 3
United States
Location: Knoxville, TN

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TNJames 12June 2018: Using V19 of Punch Architectural on latest Windows 10 on Powerhouse "game" technology computer.

The 2D drawings of V19 Punch Architectural are functioning perfectly, including copious annotating, numerous revisions and refinements, and precise 2D zooming to fine tune the size of printouts. This is the case for all 3 floors of my 7614 sq ft design of a large home; also for a separate design of a very big 2800 sq ft garage with four 40-ft-deep stalls and an oversize RV bus stall.

Nothing is lost when V19 locks up every week or three.

Displaying 3D renderings, however, has serious problems, which I believe are tied to a well-hidden table of various elevations, a table that is only visible when one uses "Select All" to highlight all the elements of a 2D "Floor 1" and then clicks on "Set Elevation". However, Punch V19 stops me from revising any data in this table of 20 or so elevations, on those rare occasions when I can display it at all (I can cycle through and read the list however).

Specifics of 3D problem: A strip of 4 rooms that display perfectly well in 2D ONLY appear dropped down 11 feet or so under the slab when displayed in a 3D rendering; this also occurs with two rooms on the 90-degree wall as well. The dropped down rooms are best viewed using a grayscale "Clearview" rendering, where they are always a part of the rendering, moving appropriately as one rotates and maneuvers the 3D view. Using a "Textured Rendering" in color, the rooms dropped down below the basement slab only appear when I click on the rendering, then disappear shortly after, until I click again.

Interestingly, when the chunk of basement floor-1 walls have dropped down in a 3D rendering, the doors and such exposed by the missing section appear perfectly within the house. It is simply a section that is dropped straight down in the 3D rendering, cut out of the remainder of the house, all the remainder of which displays appropriately in 3D.

When one looks carefully at the vertical "Room View" version of a 3D rendering, you can see that the floors of these same rooms are dropped down, yet remain perfectly in their intended lateral place.

Vertical 3D views of the house and garage roofs function as intended, showing shingles, crowns, valleys and shading for all 5 hip roof sections used in my design, the gabled roof over the screen porch, and the gable at the NE corner master bath. Pretty darn good.

The 3D renderings of the garage doors, plus the 3 window walls of this huge garage, all display perfectly, with no below-the-slab problems like occur for about a quarter of the house's daylight basement.





Patricia G.  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, June 13, 2018 9:51:12 AM(UTC)
Patricia G.

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/1/2002(UTC)
Posts: 8,287

Hi there,

Review the elevations of all the elements of your project. Also, edit the floors and see if the elevations match.

Note: in my experience computers for games are not good for rendering purposes. Games are focused in speed. Rendering needs quality. There are lots of posts regarding this issue and my recommendations. Just search rendering, video cards, etc.
Patricia G.- Forum Moderator
My Website: Punchhelpers
My Facebook page: Punchhelpers on Facebook
My eBooks: Pat’s eBooks
TNJames  
#3 Posted : Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:23:11 AM(UTC)
TNJames

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 6/13/2018(UTC)
Posts: 3
United States
Location: Knoxville, TN

Reply From TNJames to Patricia G Comments

Patricia: Thanks for the prompt response.

(1) I will again check the elevations of the various elements in my complex & heavily annotated house design as you suggested.

(2) In the lingo of today's computer marketplace, a "gaming" computer is one that is very powerful [I7 CPU, 32GB or 64GB of memory, a pair of 500GB M.2 NVMe Solid State Drives in RAID-0 , high end video card with 4GB or 8GB of VRAM, very high resolution monitor with 1980x1200 a base and 4K 3400x2160 state of the art, & therefore costly, e.g., $5000 for my wife's new MSI portable last year with a single 8GB 1080 video card].

MSI and ASUS have specialized in such high end computers, but more are joining them. Typically, a "gaming" computer is perfect for 3D rendering. For example, my older MSI portable has a 17" 1980x1200 screen, 32GB of RAM, and drives 3 attached huge 27" monitors that snap color 3D renderings to their screens. I have zero rendering problems, only Punch software elevation problems.

Neither my wife nor I play any games at all on our powerhouse MSI GT series "portable" computers, which many would call overkill, but we tend to keep our computers for a decade or longer.
Patricia G.  
#4 Posted : Thursday, June 14, 2018 8:46:55 AM(UTC)
Patricia G.

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/1/2002(UTC)
Posts: 8,287

Hi there,

You are welcome!

1 - Elevations: if you have my eBook (any version), check the chapter "Understanding the Elevations" for a better understanding of this subject.
A suggestion => visualize your project using the Elevation Editor => select the elements out of place => verify the elevation.

2 - Computers: I use this program since 2001 and I saw many odd issues related with video cards. I am also a beta tester of the programs. We do tests with different computers, different OSs, video cards, processors, etc. So, I know the differences among the different components and the equipment.

Unfortunately, most video cards are prepared for gaming and not for rendering, and games require speed: if you need to kill the Mars warrior (in your game, of course) you should kill it fast and you don't care about the thickness, height or specs of the wall behind the Mars warrior, right? :-) So, in a game, speed comes first and precision after. In Punch is different, the walls' specs come first (precision) and this takes a toll in the speed.
This is why, for some issues, we recommend to run Punch with less acceleration in order to improve the precision and quality.
Therefore, is not uncommon that some cards render too fast and in the process, they loss information.

Hope this helps.

Patricia G.- Forum Moderator
My Website: Punchhelpers
My Facebook page: Punchhelpers on Facebook
My eBooks: Pat’s eBooks
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